International Handbook on Internal Migration

International Handbook on Internal Migration

International Handbook on Internal Migration

International Handbook on Internal Migration

Synopsis

"These 21 national case studies of internal migration were written especially for this unusual and useful volume. . . . The resulting blend of the general and the particular, especially when viewed across the 21 countries, will be useful to a wide range of basic and applied social scientists." Choice

Excerpt

Demographers have acknowledged the importance of internal migration as a component of localized population change and as the major component influencing population redistribution within countries for some time. However, the profession's preoccupation with growth at the nation-state level and its obvious impact on development relegated the study of migration to a relatively less significant role than the study of fertility and mortality (Bogue, 1969; Kirk, 1960). While there can be no doubt that the problems of population growth and fluctuating levels of fertility were and still are significant enough to command a great deal of attention, there can also be no doubt that during the 1970s and 1980s we have increasingly come to realize that if we are to develop a more complete understanding of the reciprocal relationships between population and social and economic change, an understanding of migration and its causes and consequences is no less significant, and perhaps even more complex.

A number of factors and events--some specifically centered around less developed country issues, some more developed country issues, and some both-- helped to make more manifest the place and role of migration. Among these was the position adopted by many governments at the first World Population Conference that clearly stated that they regarded population distribution issues and problems as no less and in many instances more important for their national development than growth issues per se. Similarly, during the 1970s there was a new consciousness of the growth of large cities around the world and of the problems and challenges that these places posed for development on the one hand and the quality of life on the other.

Also during the 1970s there were several reversals of long-established migration trends in some countries and the debunking of myths about trends in others. The 1970 round of population censuses saw an unprecedented number of countries include questions on migration, more detailed tabulations from these, and the creation of micro-data files. These innovations facilitated more detailed . . .

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