Fifty Years of Protestant Theology

Fifty Years of Protestant Theology

Fifty Years of Protestant Theology

Fifty Years of Protestant Theology

Excerpt

When the summons went out in December, 1949, calling together evangelical faculty members in the American schools for a discussion of the predicament of modern theology, and the possible organization of what has since been denominated the Evangelical Theological Society, there was a gratifying response. Men gathered in Cincinnati from the Atlantic and the Pacific seaboards, and their stature and number spoke well for the future of evangelical theology in the nation. Historic Christian theism had not been reduced, in our times, to a possession only of unlettered disciples.

But the Cincinnati convention made clear a basic evangelical failure. The concentration on evangelism and missions, in terms of the redemptive uniqueness of Christianity, which had become the exclusive task of the evangelical enterprise in view of the prodigality of liberalism, had been permitted to obscure the responsibility of evangelicals for a competent literature reflective of the Biblical outlook. The collapse of the liberal perspective, therefore, made it possible for subevangelical movements to seize an opportunity created by the absence of sufficient and adequate evangelical works.

It is a curious fact that, were it not for the extended use of non-evangelical texts in evangelical classrooms . . .

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