Role Development and Interpersonal Competence: An Experimental Study of Role Performances in Problem-Solving Groups

Role Development and Interpersonal Competence: An Experimental Study of Role Performances in Problem-Solving Groups

Role Development and Interpersonal Competence: An Experimental Study of Role Performances in Problem-Solving Groups

Role Development and Interpersonal Competence: An Experimental Study of Role Performances in Problem-Solving Groups

Excerpt

Role Development and Interpersonal Competence presents the results of a series of experimental studies of the performances of individuals in problem-solving groups and the relationship between performance and individual motivation and development. This study attempts to trace through the development issues involved in the variety of work styles individuals establish in their interactions with other persons.

Much of contemporary life in business organizations centers around interpersonal settings. Staff meetings, committees, and task groups are but a few of the settings in which individuals in organizations engage one another. That this process is important both for the individual and for the organization hardly needs emphasis at this juncture in the continuing study of human behavior in organizations. This study attempts to demonstrate and explain that the work styles of executives are a product of the individual's history, and that there is a developmental continuity underlying styles of individual managers' performance in problem-solving settings.

This book is addressed primarily to a professional audience within universities and industry, including researchers in organizational behavior and interpersonal relations, and those responsible for initiating executive development programs.

The theory and findings presented here may result in some uneasy reactions from those responsible for executive development programs. The emphasis on developmental history tends to urge caution in assessing the possibilities of changing behavior of executives, particularly in short-run programs whose participants' sense of need for change is highly variable. The degree to which these programs result in basic . . .

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