The Drapier's Letters to the People of Ireland against Receiving Wood's Halfpence

The Drapier's Letters to the People of Ireland against Receiving Wood's Halfpence

The Drapier's Letters to the People of Ireland against Receiving Wood's Halfpence

The Drapier's Letters to the People of Ireland against Receiving Wood's Halfpence

Excerpt

In the preparation of this edition I have been shown much kindness, and have been given much assistance. In the first place, I am indebted to University College, Toronto, for granting me leave of absence in 1930, so that I could make a beginning; and to the Council of American Learned Societies for a Grant which enabled me to continue my search in 1932. In the following pages I have tried to indicate the sources of all my materials and information. But I wish to add here an acknowledgement of the great assistance I have received from the Librarians and the staffs of the following libraries, and my debt to the authorities for permission to make photostats and to print extracts from manuscripts and printed books in their charge: in England, the British Museum, the Public Record Office, the Forster Collection in the South Kensington Library, the Goldsmiths' Library in the University of London; the Bradshaw Collection in the University Library, Cambridge; the Bodleian Library, and the Wake Collection in Christ Church, Oxford: in Ireland, Trinity College Library, the National Library, the Library of the Royal Irish Academy, the King's Inns Library, and the Gilbert Collection, belonging to the city of Dublin. It is a pleasure to remember the most kindly assistance available everywhere in Dublin for one who is investigating the activities of Dean Swift. I must particularly thank Dr. Best, who gave me the freedom of the National Library, and special facilities to use the invaluable Dix Collection of books printed in Ireland, and who continued with other members of his staff to aid me after I had left. Mr. Fennelly, who houses the Gilbert Collection in the Charleville Mall Library, saved me much time by his knowledge of its unnumbered volumes, and by having some of its documents copied for me; and Mr. T. F. Higgins lent me his expert knowledge of the early Dublin newspapers there, and has since then generously provided me: with valuable information. In America I have been given every facility at Harvard College Library, and at the Seligman Collection in the Library of Columbia . . .

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