Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History

Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History

Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History

Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History

Synopsis

The first history of lesbian art in the United States, documenting works since 1970.

Excerpt

Judith F. Baca's commitment to collaborative artistic processes is rooted in her involvement with the Los Angeles Chicano movement of the 1960s and early' 70s, "which considered mural art to be the 'quintessential Chicana collective and public art form,' in that it often included people from the very community where the painting was being executed as part of the artistic team." Starting in 1969 Baca worked on mural projects with teenagers from different Chicano gangs. In 1973 she cofounded, with artist Christina Schlesinger and filmmaker Donna Deitch, the Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC) in Venice, California, a multicultural arts organization dedicated to the production, exhibition, and distribution of public art. In working with kids from the gangs, she found her gender often was an asset: "I was no threat to their machismo. Had I been a man, they would have been suspicious of my presence in their territory.... Few girls participated during that time. It was much easier organizing among the young men because girls were not allowed the same . . .

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