The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799 - Vol. 31

The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799 - Vol. 31

The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799 - Vol. 31

The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799 - Vol. 31

Excerpt

To GOVERNOR BEVERLEY RANDOLPH

New York, January 22, 1790.

Sir: As it is of considerable consequence to the Public that a letter which I have just written to Mr. Jefferson should reach him at as early a period as may be, and as I am unacquainted with any other certain channel of conveyance, I have taken the liberty of enclosing it to your Excellency. The importance of having it delivered to him with certainty and expedition, I hope will be considered as an apology for the trouble which may be occasioned by this measure. And even for the farther favor I am about to ask, of having it dispathed [sic] by a particular Messenger; in case no opportunity (that might with safety be depended upon) should present itself, of forwarding it in a short time from Richmond to Montecello. With sentiments of esteem, I have the honor etc.1 [ V. S. L.]

To EBENEZER TUCKER2

New York, January 24, 1790.

Sir: Captain Burnett delivered me your letter of the 18. instant, and is so obliging as to take charge of this answer.

It is my sincere opinion that the land mentioned in it3 is worth what I asked for it, to wit four dollars per acre, and once would have sold for it; but, if, in the present scarcity of cash it will not fetch that sum, let those, who are really inclinable to buy, come forward, like men that are in earnest, and say what they will give. If they, or their Agent have seen the land, (and without this it is useless to name any price) have examined its qualities and improvements, they can tell what they will give, and ought to act like fair and candid men. On these terms I am ready to treat with them. It is not my intention to dispose of the land for a song, nor is it my wish to higgle, or make many words to the bargain; for which reason I pray them to come to a decision at once, and that you would inform me of the result. At any rate it would be well for you to write to me, and soon, that I may not miss any other offer, should any be made to, Sir, etc.4

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