The Greatest of Literary Problems: The Authorship of the Shakespeare Works: an Exposition of All the Points at Issue, from Their Inception to the Present Moment

The Greatest of Literary Problems: The Authorship of the Shakespeare Works: an Exposition of All the Points at Issue, from Their Inception to the Present Moment

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The Greatest of Literary Problems: The Authorship of the Shakespeare Works: an Exposition of All the Points at Issue, from Their Inception to the Present Moment

The Greatest of Literary Problems: The Authorship of the Shakespeare Works: an Exposition of All the Points at Issue, from Their Inception to the Present Moment

Read FREE!

Excerpt

To my Critics:

When I wrote The Greatest of Literary Problems, I was hoping to escape the charge of offensive dogmatism, inasmuch as, when expressing my own opinion upon a point at issue, I was careful to observe that I submitted it to the judgment of my reader, and acknowledged in my Preface that I realized that what we often believe to be principles for which we valorously battle, not infrequently turn out to be but opinions beyond which may be a wide field of debatable ground. Instead, however, of yielding me the credit of at least an attempt to be fair, some irreconcilable opponents of my thesis have bestowed upon me names unworthy to be applied, by any wayfarer in this world of doubt, to another. To those who have resorted to abuse and caviled at trivial points in my treatment of what I believe to be an important subject, I make no rejoinder, hoping that eventually they will give it due attention and show, if possible, wherein I have erred in my exposition of it.

It is to those open-minded students who have really read my book and expressed approval of its "first three hundred and ninety pages or so," but disapproval of those treating of Bacon's authorship of works which have been accredited to others, and especially of ciphers, that I address myself. I doubt if they have sufficiently considered the fact that Francis Bacon was the inventor of a cipher for concealing messages in books, which he has described in his De Augmentis Scientiarum, and that there has been published a large body of literary matter, comprising historical and dramatic works, as well as an English version of the Iliad, which it is claimed were found concealed in cipher, not only in Bacon's acknowledged works, but also in the first "Shakespeare" Folio. This . . .

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