The Village of the Great Kivas on the Zauni Reservation, New Mexico

The Village of the Great Kivas on the Zauni Reservation, New Mexico

The Village of the Great Kivas on the Zauni Reservation, New Mexico

The Village of the Great Kivas on the Zauni Reservation, New Mexico

Excerpt

of finds. Linda B. Roberts kept the field catalogue, supervised the cleaning of specimens, restored broken pottery, and assisted in the preparation of drawings. Supt. G. A. Trotter of the Zuñi Reservation had a manifest and appreciative interest in the excavations and extended many courtesies to the expedition.

Within the confines of the present-day political domains of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, western Texas, and northern Mexico are found innumerable traces of former human occupancy. In many cases the record is dim indeed and all but obliterated. On the other hand, there are remains which even the most casual observer can not fail to note. From the first penetration of the region by white men in the era of Spanish exploration to the present day there has been an ever-increasing interest in these vestiges of earlier peoples and a desire to know their history. During the last .50 years the efforts of many men have been devoted to the diverse phases of the problem, and out of their patient gathering of evidence has developed a fascinating and vivid narrative of the growth of southwestern cultures.

As would be expected, the obvious features were those first to attract the investigator. Consequently the great cliff houses and ruins of structures, built in the open, on mesa tops and valley floors occupied the excavators for many years. It is only recently that the lesser and inconspicuous remains have received their due share of attention and have contributed the information essential to a knowledge of what actually transpired in the region. There are still phases to be more thoroughly studied and better understood before the story can be considered complete, even though the broad outline is now well defined. The recognition of the various stages in the cultural sequence is so recent and new information is being obtained so rapidly that a review of the present status is deemed advisable if there is to be a proper understanding of the relation which the ruins described in the major portion of this report bear to others in the area.

Scattered throughout the Southwest, probably antedating the beginning of the Christian era by many centuries, was a nomadic people dependent to a large extent upon the hunt and a chance gathering of wild seeds, fruits, and plant roots for their livelihood. At the present time evidence of such a group is meager indeed, but there have been sufficient indications to warrant the postulation of its having existed. A number of finds which can be attributed to human occupancy of portions of the area at a comparatively remote date have been made within the last few years. Thus far, however, none of the . . .

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