Changes and Experiments in Liberal-Arts Education

Changes and Experiments in Liberal-Arts Education

Changes and Experiments in Liberal-Arts Education

Changes and Experiments in Liberal-Arts Education

Excerpt

While this volume on liberal-arts education is not the work of a committee appointed by this Society, and while the arrangements for its appearance as Part II of the Thirty-First Yearbook were begun and completed within ten months of the date of its publication, it by no means represents a hastily made decision or an undertaking foreign to the policies or to the plans of the Directors of the Society. In fact, eight years ago, at the first 1924 meeting of the newly created Board of Directors, one of the projects under discussion was a report on colleges of liberal arts that had been submitted for consideration by F. J. Kelly -- a report that was subsequently given to other agencies for publication.

At the Dallas meeting of the Board, in February, 1927, Dr. Harold Rugg, then a member of the Board, urged that the Society undertake a frank discussion of "The American College." Dr. Rugg developed this idea more fully at the Rochester meeting, in November, 1928, proposing that from nine to twelve school men and college men should combine to study especially the liberal-arts branch of the American college, possibly limiting their report to problems of the curriculum. Action on this proposal was deferred on account of a study reported to be under way by the National Society of College Teachers of Education and of a probable still more exhaustive study by the North Central Association.

In May, 1929, the question of a yearbook on the liberal-arts college was again debated and was referred to Director Charters for further consideration. He reported to the Board at its Atlantic City meeting, in February, 1930, that he had conferred and corresponded with ten persons familiar with the situation, that all of them favored the general idea, but that, in view of the possible participation of the General Education Board in an elaborate study and of the enterprise already being pushed forward by Dr. Kathryn McHale for the American Association of University Women, it was doubtful whether this Society ought to inaugurate a third investigatory study. Accordingly, the whole matter was laid on the table, where it remained for a year, until April, 1931. At that time the illness of the late Professor Bonser disrupted the Board's plans for Part II of the 1932 Yearbook, and at . . .

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