Child Development: Universal Stage of Infancy - Vol. 2

Child Development: Universal Stage of Infancy - Vol. 2

Child Development: Universal Stage of Infancy - Vol. 2

Child Development: Universal Stage of Infancy - Vol. 2

Excerpt

In Volume I a convenient distinction was made between the subject matters of biology and psychology.

Biology, it was pointed out, is typically concerned with the anatomical structure and the physiological functioning of the parts of the body. That is, biology deals with the glands, muscles, bones, the connecting mechanisms of the body such as the nervous, circulatory, and endocrine systems, and with the interrelationships among these parts and systems.

Psychology, in contrast, is concerned with the interactions of the complete, integral organism with environmental events.

Kantor (1959) elaborated on this distinction:

When we compare biology with psychology we find that in the former the evolutional changes and transformations are interconnected with an entity or substantive form, that is an organism, while in psychology the evolutional processes are connected only with acts. In biology current behavioral changes are functions of morphological or anatomical structure. In psychological activities the organism performing the activity is not structurally as important as the mutual interactions it performs in connection with other things (p. 134, italics ours).

Two points should be made about the relationships between biological and psychological phenomena: both classes of events take place at the same time, and each has effects on the other.

The organism is always interacting with an environment; and while some acts are more convenient to study than others, any . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.