Woodworth & Schlossberg's Experimental Psychology

Woodworth & Schlossberg's Experimental Psychology

Woodworth & Schlossberg's Experimental Psychology

Woodworth & Schlossberg's Experimental Psychology

Excerpt

In 1938, Robert S. Woodworth brought out the first edition of his Experimental Psychology. In his preface he remarked on the "youth and immaturity of experimental psychology" in which "the student can rather quickly penetrate the zone of unsettled problems in original investigation." Woodworth traces the beginning of his work on the book to 1910 and states that a preliminary mimeographed edition of the book came out in 1920 with the collaboration of A. T. Poffenburger.

Surely no other psychologist could have made so lucid and comprehensive a presentation of the field as did Woodworth in 1938. He had had experience as a teacher and student in the basic fields of mathematics, philosophy, and physiology. He had also done research in collaboration with the great Sir Charles Sherrington in the study of expressions of anger and defense in the decerebrate cat. He later worked with Thorndike in the more traditionally psychological area of transfer of training and did his own research on voluntary movement, imageless thought, psychophysics, motivation, and tests of emotional stability. All this had brought Woodworth to the age of 70 by the time Experimental Psychology first appeared. Prior to that he had written several other books, including a revision of Ladd Physiological Psychology, the widely used Contemporary Schools of Psychology, and the best-selling elementary textbook, Psychology, of which there were five editions from 1921 to 1947.

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