Manifesto for a New Medicine: Your Guide to Healing Partnerships and the Wise Use of Alternative Therapies

Manifesto for a New Medicine: Your Guide to Healing Partnerships and the Wise Use of Alternative Therapies

Manifesto for a New Medicine: Your Guide to Healing Partnerships and the Wise Use of Alternative Therapies

Manifesto for a New Medicine: Your Guide to Healing Partnerships and the Wise Use of Alternative Therapies

Synopsis

More than a third of Americans have already begun to explore alternative techniques such as yoga, meditation, nutritional therapies, massage, acupuncture, homeopathy, chiropractic, herbalism, and prayer, but we don't know which approaches to trust, or what accounts for their effectiveness, and our doctors are not able to tell us. We want an authoritative guide to separate what's truly worthwhile from what's simply well promoted, to help us to see what's right for each of us. James S. Gordon is that guide, and Manifesto for a New Medicine is that guidebook. For the last twenty-five years, Dr. Gordon has pioneered an approach to healing that synthesizes the best of modern, scientific medicine with the best of the alternative techniques. Here he leads us step by step through convincing and absorbing case studies of the successful use of these alternatives, presenting clearly and simply the scientific bases for them. He also shows us how each of us can incorporate alternative therapies as an integralpart of our health care and our daily lives.

Excerpt

Their voices have such urgency in them. "I have ovarian cancer," one woman begins, even before she tells me her name, "with metastases to my brain." "My arthritis is so bad," a man shouts into my ear, "it takes me an hour to get out of bed." "I'm depressed," intones another voice, as dark and deliberate as a funeral march. "They've given me every drug and nothing does any good." "My child has terrible asthma." "My blood pressure's off the charts." "I've got chronic fatigue syndrome." "My father has Parkinson's disease." They are like shipwrecked sailors shouting to a passing boat.

So-and-so said to call, they continue, offering me the name like an outstretched hand. Sometimes I recognize a referral from one of my patients, or a physician or psychotherapist I know. More often than not now, a friend of a friend of one of my patients has suggested it, or a few words of mine in a magazine, or a doctor, desperate for assistance, who has also heard or read "something." Why, I ask, into the rush of the appeal, against the tide of the story. "What have you heard? Do you know what you're getting into? . . ."

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