Psychotherapy in a New Key: A Guide to Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy in a New Key: A Guide to Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy in a New Key: A Guide to Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy in a New Key: A Guide to Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy

Synopsis

Clear, practical, and wise, this book- a codification of WLDP- offers an integrated model of therapy, close to clinical data, that is applicable to therapy regardless of length of treatment.

Excerpt

Over the years, Hans Strupp has demonstrated an admirable, unflagging persistence in tackling the difficulties of systematic research in psychotherapy. His work has always been psychoanalytically informed. It has remained so even through the rise, and apparent beginning subsidence of the wave, of behavior therapy and its replacement by cognitive-behavior therapy.

Psychoanalysis proper and psychoanalytic psychotherapy have always been distinguished by the systematic attention to the analysis of the transference in psychoanalysis and by the greater focus on extra-transference material in psychotherapy (with a concomitant explicit analysis of transference only if unavoidable).

The present work is no mere recapitulation of the many available descriptions of psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Indeed, its great merit lies in the fact that it shares the outlook of a beginning movement toward a greater integration of classical and interpersonal psychoanalytic theory and technique -- that is, to place significantly greater stress on their dyadic aspects. One result has been a greater emphasis on the analysis of transference even when the external conditions, such as lesser frequency, sitting up, the nature of the psychopathology, and the training of the therapist are not those of psychoanalysis proper. The main reason this shift has seemed to many incompatible with conditions other than those of psychoanalysis proper is that it is not realized that it makes sense only in the context of a reconceptualization of transference and the nature of psychosocial reality. Rather than seeing psychosocial reality as dichotomized into veridical and distorted, with transference defined as a distortion, an alternate view is that psychosocial reality is multiple; it is contributed to by both participants in the psychotherapeutic interaction, with transference characterized by the rigidity with which reality is construed and constructed.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.