Psychology and the Soul

Psychology and the Soul

Psychology and the Soul

Psychology and the Soul

Excerpt

While eighteen years have passed since Dr. Otto Rank published his Seelenglaube und Psychologie, the durability of his theses, and the shift in psychological thinking from German- to English-speaking peoples, have seemed to justify the present translation.

Because a psychological point of view is not a matter of sheer intellect, psychological convictions are apt to be firm, and psychological pioneers correspondingly rare. One really discovers a new point of view only through the painful relinquishment of an old one, and a translator as such can only prepare for this discovery to the extent of putting the new point of view into the learner's native language when it is not already there. If the present translation does just this much, and helps thereby to minimize the duplication of creative effort that already characterizes the helping professions, it will have served a genuine purpose. If also it can encourage some creativity beyond itself, it will not have failed its own philosophy.

Some professional readers who want only to ascertain what Rank has to say may wish that he had let his writings express simply the result of his movement away from Freud, rather than the movement as well. The severity of Rank's criticisms may make them more obnoxious; and the unsympathetic reader is not the only one whom Bank may anger, for neutral and sympathetic readers may have frequent cause for irritation with him. Two motives which underlay Rank's writing should not be disregarded. The first stemmed from the fact that his own developing point of view, and his criti-

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