Marketing Management: A Systems Perspective

Marketing Management: A Systems Perspective

Marketing Management: A Systems Perspective

Marketing Management: A Systems Perspective

Excerpt

This volume is designed to meet the needs of marketing management courses. The objective is to present a clear, realistic, and contemporary perspective of marketing. Accordingly, the subject matter reflects major innovations and advancements currently shaping marketing thought and practice.

The marketing discipline is now in a state of flux and transition. Its scope, approaches, and content are being reoriented. The scope is being altered to reflect such developments as increasing social responsibilities, changing governmental relationships, and the internationalization of marketing. The approaches are being restructured as a result of the current emphasis on contributions of the behavioral and social sciences, quantitative methods, systems analyses, and computer technology. The content is being modified by the appearance of the new marketing concepts, models, theories, courses, and curricula.

Where does this book fit within a curriculum? Is it designed mainly for academicians or executives? Is it exclusively for undergraduate or for graduate students? Does it follow logically after a more descriptive approach to marketing or precede it? Should it be used as an introductory book in marketing? The answers to such questions depend on a variety of factors. Included are the students' backgrounds, the institutional setting, the philosophy of the marketing program, the supplementary cases and readings, the objectives of the courses, and, most assuredly, the professors' viewpoints and goals.

Courses in marketing management are usually planned to meet the requirements of divergent groups of students. Included are undergraduates both in marketing and a variety of other disciplines, graduate students in MBA and other programs, and executives in continuing-education courses. In teaching marketing to all of them over a period of almost twenty years, I have considered two pedagogical guidelines to be of signal importance. First, marketing should be taught in a systematic, integrated, interesting, and challenging fashion. Unless this is achieved, marketing will not attract and hold its share of talented students. The future availability of creative teachers, researchers, and marketing executives is dependent on them.

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