Beyond the Learning Organization: Creating a Culture of Continuous Growth and Development through State-Of-The-Art Human Resource Practices

Beyond the Learning Organization: Creating a Culture of Continuous Growth and Development through State-Of-The-Art Human Resource Practices

Beyond the Learning Organization: Creating a Culture of Continuous Growth and Development through State-Of-The-Art Human Resource Practices

Beyond the Learning Organization: Creating a Culture of Continuous Growth and Development through State-Of-The-Art Human Resource Practices

Synopsis

Beyond the Learning Organization will help executives, managers, and human resource professionals put the concepts of the "developmental organization" into practice. Experts in the field of human resource and organizational development, Jerry W. Gilley and Ann Maycunich examine how the latest advances in HR principles and practices (including recruiting, training, planning, career development, performance management, job design, and compensation and benefits) can be integrated to drive corporate renewal and growth. Ultimately, they outline a process for creating an organizational environment that is able to address a wide variety of competitive and strategic challenges, adapt to internal and external changes, and recognize and reward employees at all levels for contributing to corporate goals.

Excerpt


Traditional, Learning, and Developmental Organizations

A virtual certainty in any organization's annual report is a statement of how important employees are to the ultimate success of the business. These organizations claim that their employees are their number one priority. They further assert that their efforts and resources are focused on employee satisfaction and development. In some situations, such statements are absolutely true. Unfortunately, these statements are often a mere collection of words designed to impress potential shareholders. On closer examination, organizational reality is considerably different from the words expressed in the annual report. Typically, employees are treated as disposable resources to be used and disposed of as the organization sees fit, like pawns in a great, competitive contest among the mighty lords of industry. Because of this approach, many of a firm's best employees leave, seeking opportunities for growth, development, and appreciation in other organizations.

In many organizations there exists a disconnect between the perceived importance of employees and their treatment within the firm. When we go beyond the rhetoric of organizational ease and identify the way organizations go about developing their human resources, we discover a remarkable disparity. Let us illustrate. One of the world's largest . . .

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