Diagnostic Monitoring of Skill and Knowledge Acquisition

Diagnostic Monitoring of Skill and Knowledge Acquisition

Diagnostic Monitoring of Skill and Knowledge Acquisition

Diagnostic Monitoring of Skill and Knowledge Acquisition

Synopsis

An adjunct to the increased emphasis on developing students' critical thinking and higher order skills is the need for methods to monitor and evaluate these abilities. These papers provide insight into current techniques and examine possibilities for the future. The contributors to Diagnostic Monitoring of Skill and Knowledge Acquisition focus on two beliefs: that new kinds of tests and assessment methods are needed; and that instruction and learning can be improved by developing new assessment methods based on work in cognitive science.

Excerpt

Nonnan Frederiksen Educational Testing Service

The chapters in this book are based on papers that were presented at a 3-day conference on "Diagnostic Monitoring of Skill and Knowledge Acquisition." the planning of that conference, at least from my point of view, was motivated by two beliefs. One was that new kinds of tests and assessment methods are needed, not just for the evaluation of school learning, but also to contribute directly to the instructional process. the standardized tests that are commonly used in schools today may actually have harmful effects with regard to what is taught and what is learned in school. the other belief is that the work in cognitive science that has been going on for 30 years or so, largely unnoticed by psychometricians, can provide a theoretical basis for developing new assessment methods that can improve instruction and learning.

Harmful effects of conventional tests

The harmful effects of conventional tests, I believe, are largely attributable to the almost universal use of the multiple-choice format. the argument is as follows. First, it is difficult (although not impossible) to write multiple-choice items that assess the higher-order skills that are involved in such things as drawing inferences, analyzing text, or demonstrating a deep understanding of a domain; as a result, a large proportion of the items in an achievement test measure only factual knowledge. Choosing the right answer to such an item may in many instances be a matter of simple recognition or a search of the memory store to find a match to one of the options. Sometimes the options provide cues as to what the correct answer is or how to generate it. in any case, it is difficult to be creative while . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.