The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799 - Vol. 37

The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799 - Vol. 37

The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799 - Vol. 37

The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799 - Vol. 37

Excerpt

*To JAMES ANDERSON

Mount Vernon, November 1, 1798.

Mr. Anderson: Circumstances may render it necessary for me to make a journey to the Seat of Government: and letters which I expect every Post day, will determine whether I shall take it or not. If I go, my departure will be sudden, and how long I may be absent from home, is uncertain; I do not expect however, that it can exceed four, or at most five Weeks.

With respect to the Farms and Meadows I shall say but little; for as a rotation of Crops is agreed upon; and the fields designated for the Crops of next year; nothing more is necessary than to pursue strictly the means that are to carry them into effect, and to obtain, by every contrivance that can be devised, all the manure than can be raised or made for the Corn Crops, at the several Farms; For unless these fields are highly manured, the reduction of the quantity of ground for this article, will prove a ruinous measure; because all the succeeding Crops depend entirely upon the improvement these fields receive for Corn, of course, if that crop does not succeed, all the rest must fail

As the Meadows seem to be progressing in a very good, and proper train, I shall say nothing more, relatively to them, but to desire that you will proceed in the course you are in; and apply them to the uses mentd. in the Rotation.

. . .1useless. and the pipe, and lea . . . tolerably low, to enab . . . Negro children, to draw w[ater] . . .

The sooner the field N[egros] . . . [M]uddy hole is laid off] for Peach . . . [p]lanted thereon the better it will be; on . . .

When this is done, let the fi . . . e rod (if the rows are intend . . . art) from the fence which di . . . Corn) from it: this will make . . . with the other fence leading to the Gum [spr,] at right angles; and the short rows will but against the fence which divides No 4 from No 5. Great care and pains must be taken in laying the list, and crossing of it, true, or the Trees will not be in a range more than one way, if they are that. A two pole rod would be too unwieldy to get his distance with between the rows; but it ought not to be less than one rod in length; and in taking his distance, he should be careful always to go straight, or his rows will be wider or narrower in proportion to his mistakes.

After the Wood at Muddy is all used, let the firing for Mansion house and your own be taken from the Wood South of the White Gate, where the thinning commenced last year.

Your enquiries after a distiller shd. be diligant, that I may not be put to a nonplus or sustain any injury from the interruption of the work for want of one after January.

The purchasing of Wheat, and selling of flour, I shall leave to your own judgment and discretion. But as the price of the former (except2

The work for the Carpenters, [Joiner], and Bricklayers; and the other . . . should have it executed; is contained on a seperate sheet of Paper; to be referred to.

It never was my custom to trust [solely] the measurement of my Corn by the Overseers. I always, when I had no Manager, . . .

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