Hawthorne: A Study in Solitude

Hawthorne: A Study in Solitude

Hawthorne: A Study in Solitude

Hawthorne: A Study in Solitude

Excerpt

Before 1830 the New England scene had degenerated into a despondent and fossilized spectacle. Two hundred years of pioneering effort, of land-clearing and upbuilding in the materialistic sense, of Indian wars and revolution, and of a thin semi-bitter social coagulation had resulted in a superficially unified community that rested upon the dark foundation of the so-called Puritan tradition. This tradition, bulwarked by an intense religious dogma, was not strong enough in itself to outlast the peculiar circumstances that brought it into being. So long as ethical rules dominated the daily life of the community just so long would the tradition last as a living thing, a phenomenon not without its admirable qualities in a New World that demanded an invincible front of its conquerors; and for some years it did so last, growing, however, more dry and shell-like as the seasons succeeded one another. But with the crumbling of the religious bulwark, with the splitting apart of an heretofore unified . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.