Inventors and Engineers of Old New Haven: A Series of Six Lectures Given in 1938 under the Auspices of the School of Engineering, Yale University

Inventors and Engineers of Old New Haven: A Series of Six Lectures Given in 1938 under the Auspices of the School of Engineering, Yale University

Inventors and Engineers of Old New Haven: A Series of Six Lectures Given in 1938 under the Auspices of the School of Engineering, Yale University

Inventors and Engineers of Old New Haven: A Series of Six Lectures Given in 1938 under the Auspices of the School of Engineering, Yale University

Excerpt

EW cities of moderate size are as widely known as New Haven for extent and quality of manufactured products, coupled with leadership in educational affairs. The city's reputation in both fields is a cherished heritage from early colonial days. A century and a half ago Yale was a collegiate school, established to train Connecticut youth for service in church and civil state. At about this time New Haven, still a small town dependent largely on its shipping, began unaccountably to produce and to attract to itself in increasing numbers young men of outstanding originality and vision in mechanical and industrial affairs. In the course of years not a few of these men bit upon inventions or improved methods that affected the social, economic and industrial life of the nation, indeed of the world. The list need only be suggested here; the submarine, the cotton industry, the interchangeable parts system of manufacture, firearms, the truss bridge, rubber, clocks, hardware, matches, artificial refrigeration, the telegraph, modern highway and concrete construction, railways, the petroleum industry, the telephone central exchange. All these came into being or were to some extent cradled here, at the hands of men trained either in shop or college, or both. Among the more widely known of this group are Eli Whitney, David Bushnell, Ithiel Town, Charles Goodyear, Samuel Finley Breese Morse, Eli Whitney Blake, Alexander Catlin Twining, Chauncey Jerome, Henry Farnam. Our city is proud to have had among her citizens these pioneers in science, engineering and industry, men whose ingenuity, resource and vision have left their indelible impress upon our civilization.

It therefore seemed fitting that, as a prelude to New Haven's Tercentenary celebration, the School of Engineering of Yale University should arrange a series of lectures which would call the roll of local inventors, engineers, and practical scientists of other days whose achievements have brought fame to both City and Uni-

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