The Russia I Believe In: The Memoirs of Samuel N. Harper, 1902-1941

The Russia I Believe In: The Memoirs of Samuel N. Harper, 1902-1941

The Russia I Believe In: The Memoirs of Samuel N. Harper, 1902-1941

The Russia I Believe In: The Memoirs of Samuel N. Harper, 1902-1941

Excerpt

The unfinished memoirs of my brother, Samuel Northrup Harper, which are the basis of this book, were found upon his death among his Russian documents--a collection of notes, letters, and papers accumulated during a period of more than forty years of Russian travel and study. In the dark years of 1940 and 1941, when everyone was scowling at the mention of the word Russia, I knew that my brother was finding great solace in preparing his memoirs, even though he never showed them to anyone.

As I read the manuscript, I was impressed by its clear, frank disclosure of my brother's character and of the unusually vital life he had made out of his academic career, as well as by its informal and personal approach to the heroic struggles of Russia over these forty-odd years. As it stood, the material was not ready for publication. Had the memoirs been designed for the academic world, as were most of my brother's publications, I should not have dared to attempt their further editing. But he obviously meant the book to be as much about himself in relation to Russia as about Russia itself. It can also be said to be about us all, for my brother's observations on public opinion with respect to Russia throughout these years are sensitive and often penetrating.

Through the very able efforts of Ronald Thompson, a graduate student who came to the University of Chicago to study under my brother in the field of Russia, my brother's Russian papers were sorted out and put in chronological order. In the course of a year of meticulous and scholarly work Mr. Thompson brought into usable shape the full collection of travel notes, records of interviews with leaders of thought, original studies, and reports, lectures, and memoranda covering many phases of Russia and the Russians. There were also my brother's copies of translations of records, newspaper articles, and reports documenting the early revolutionary Bolshevik days during the period of 1918-21--a period still not well known--which were prepared by him while he was attached to the State Department during these years. To me the most interesting collection was the very complete file of his correspondence, including his letters to the family written while he was on his travels, as . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.