Prohibition: Legal and Illegal

Prohibition: Legal and Illegal

Prohibition: Legal and Illegal

Prohibition: Legal and Illegal

Excerpt

In a letter dated April 1, 1717, that accomplished epistolean, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, wrote: "I had the advantage of lodging three weeks at Belgrade with a principal effendi, that is to say, a scholar (i.e., a lawyer-priest). He made no scruple of deviating from some part of Mahomet's law by drinking wine with the same freedom as we did. When I asked him how he came to allow himself that liberty he made answer that all creatures of God are good and are designed for the use of man, however that the prohibition of wine is a very wise maxim, and meant for the common people, being the source of all disorders amongst them; but that the prophet never designed to confine those who knew how to use it with moderation; nevertheless, he said that scandal ought to be avoided and that he never drank it in public. This is the general way of thinking among them and very few forbear drinking wine that are able to afford it."

More than two hundred years after this writing the practice of the Mohammedans is being copied by millions of Americans in respect of the eighteenth amendment, though the drinking is not always in . . .

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