The Rise and Fall of Third Parties: From Anti-Masonry to Wallace

The Rise and Fall of Third Parties: From Anti-Masonry to Wallace

The Rise and Fall of Third Parties: From Anti-Masonry to Wallace

The Rise and Fall of Third Parties: From Anti-Masonry to Wallace

Excerpt

Even without Henry Wallace's new movement to bring it into focus, the historical experience of American third parties--not all of them have been "liberal"--is of considerable significance at the present time.

In recent years, many liberals, progressives, farmers and trade unionists have been giving increasing thought to the need for a permanent third party. Long before Wallace launched his candidacy, sundry organizations were considering the possibilities of a new political movement.

The Americans for Democratic Action, an organization composed of ex-New Dealers and miscellaneous liberals, has for sometime been hatching ambitious plans for its special variety of liberalism. Another group, the Committee on Education For a New Party, headed by the Pullman Porters' A. Phillip Randolph, has been studying ways and means of making up a berth in which liberals--strange bed-fellows all--could crowd together. In New York, members of the Liberal Party have been speculating hopefully about expanding on a national scale. In Wisconsin, the Progressives, who suffered ignominious rebuffs when they generously offered to liberalize the Republican Party, have been giving serious consideration to the advisability of revitalizing their movement.

Since none of these groups are at all happy about Henry Wallace's candidacy, it is plainly evident that the dream of and trend toward a genuine third party will continue to be a highly important factor in the American political scene.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.