Literary Theories in Praxis

Literary Theories in Praxis

Literary Theories in Praxis

Literary Theories in Praxis

Synopsis

Literary Theories in Praxis analyzes the ways in which critical theories are transformed into literary criticism and methodology. To demonstrate the application of this analysis, critical writings of Roland Barthes, Harold Bloom, Cleanth Brooks, Jacques Derrida, Northrop Frye, Norman Holland, Barbara Johnson, Jacques Lacan, Adrienne Rich, and Robert Scholes are examined in terms of the primary critical stance each author employs-New Critical, phenomenological, archetypal, structuralist/semiotic, sociological, psychoanalytic, reader-response, deconstructionist, or humanist.

The book is divided into nine sections, each with a prefatory essay explaining the critical stance taken in the selections that follow and describing how theory becomes literary criticism. In a headnote to each selection, Staton analyzes how the critic applies his or her critical methodology to the subject literary work. Shirley F. Staton's introduction sketches the overall philosophical positions and relationships among the various critical modes.

Excerpt

Literary Theories in Praxis introduces you to nine different types of contemporary criticism by showing how various cultural theories actually work in practice. Each of these forty-four essays anchors its theory to familiar topics -- short stories, poems, films, or popular culture. Many of the essays focus on the same six, well-known, poems or stories: Dickinson's My Life had stood -- , Hawthorne's The Birthmark, Poe's The Purloined Letter, Yeats's Sailing to Byzantium, Faulkner's A Rose for Emily, or O'Connor's Revelation. You are encouraged to read these critical selections in two different but complementary ways. You can choose to read several essays from the various critical modes clustered about one subject, such as New Critical, archetypal, structuralist, historical, Marxist, psychoanalytic, and humanist analyses of "Sailing to Byzantium." (ConText [below] explains what these terms mean. Use the Contents Arranged by Topic to select the essays grouped around one particular subject.) Or you can read several essays from one critical perspective but on various topics: New Critical interpretations of My Life had stood -- , Sailing to Byzantium, The Birthmark, The Purloined Letter, A Rose for Emily, and Revelation. (For this perspective, consult the Contents.)

Both approaches have certain obvious advantages. Reading several essays from the same critical stance emphasizes similarities. We get the feel of a particular criticism more easily. On the other hand, reading selections from different critical positions enables us to compare the relative effectiveness of certain types of criticism with certain types of literature. Taken together, this double perspective sheds light on how . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.