China's Modern Economy in Historical Perspective: Sponsored by the Social Science Research Council

China's Modern Economy in Historical Perspective: Sponsored by the Social Science Research Council

China's Modern Economy in Historical Perspective: Sponsored by the Social Science Research Council

China's Modern Economy in Historical Perspective: Sponsored by the Social Science Research Council

Synopsis

Why did it take China more than a century after its defeat in the first Opium War to begin systematically acquiring the fruits of modern technology? To what extent did the rapid economic developments after 1949 depend on features unique to China and to Chinese history as well as on the socialist reorganization of society? These are the major questions examined in this collection of papers which challenges many previously accepted generalizations about the nature and extent of advances in China's economy during the twentieth century.

The papers discuss the positive and negative effects of foreign imperialism on Chinese economic development, the adequacy of China's financial resources for major economic initiatives, the state of science and technology in late traditional China, the changing structure of national product and distribution of income, the cotton textile and small machine-building industries as examples of pre-1949 economic bases, the village-market town structure of rural China, the tradition of cooperative efforts in agriculture, and the influence of the Yenan period on the economic thinking of China's leaders.

Excerpt

The papers in this volume were prepared originally for a conference in Bermuda in June 1973 under the sponsorship of the Subcommittee for Research on the Chinese Economy of the Joint Committee on Contemporary China of the Social Science Research Council and the American Council of Learned Societies, with support from the Ford Foundation. the papers presented were substantially revised and edited prior to their inclusion in this volume.

Participants in the conference who did not prepare papers for this volume played a particularly valuable role as discussants and rapporteurs. Those present, in addition to the authors, were Alexander Eckstein (University of Michigan), John Gurley (Stanford University), Robert Hartwell (University of Pennsylvania), Albert Keidel (Harvard University), Paul Kuznets (Indiana University), Simon Kuznets (Harvard University), Bruce Reynolds (University of Michigan), David L. Sills (Social Science Research Council), and Yeh-chien Wang (Kent State University).

The subcommittee is indebted to Mrs. Olive Holmes, who edited the conference papers, and to Miss Laura Hannan, who did much of the typing. D.H.P.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.