Foundations of Criminal Science: The Development of Knowledge - Vol. 1

Foundations of Criminal Science: The Development of Knowledge - Vol. 1

Foundations of Criminal Science: The Development of Knowledge - Vol. 1

Foundations of Criminal Science: The Development of Knowledge - Vol. 1

Synopsis

Criminal scientists center their investigative energies on the individual offender, cognizant that this individual is part of a wider system of interacting physical, social, and psychological influences. Presented in two volumes, this tome explores the complex interplay of variables that give rise to criminal outcomes. Volume 1 considers knowledge development as represented by research examining the contextual, empirical, and theoretical foundations of crime. Building on knowledge reviewed in the first volume, Volume 2 addresses the issue of knowledge utilization. Assessment, prediction, classification, intervention, prevention, and several other categories of application science are featured.

Excerpt

In 1989 police had their first "viable suspect" in the Green River murders. A 38-year-old former law student was alleged by police to have been responsible for the mutilation deaths of 48 young women, although further investigation revealed that this individual could not have been responsible for the deaths of the majority of these young women. In the spring of the same year a 28-year- old female investment banker was assaulted by a group of nine 14- to 17-year- old males as she jogged through New York's Central Park. This woman was beaten, raped, and left for dead in a highly publicized case of what would soon become known as "wilding." It was also during the spring of 1989 that residents of Atlanta, Georgia, were warned of the continuing machinations of a female burglar who has been given the nickname "Catwoman" because she has avoided apprehension in the past by using the ruse of searching for her pet Siamese with persons who happen to catch her in the act of burglarizing their homes. Police maintain that the Catwoman has visited Atlanta for ten springs and during that time has made off with $1 million in valuables, though she has only been convicted for burglary once. Finally, on October 24, 1989, a federal judge in Charlotte, North Carolina, sentenced television evangelist Jim Bakker to a 45- year sentence and fined him $500,000 for defrauding thousands of his followers out of several million dollars.

What do these four true-life situations have in common? First, though statistics show that the amount of violent crime has decreased slightly since 1980, criminals continue to exact a heavy toll on their victims, not to mention society as a whole. These cases also illustrate that crime is a genuinely serious problem in need of bona fide solutions, not bipartisan bickering, courtroom histrionics, or pseudo- scientific triviality. Too long have we allowed ourselves to be diverted from investigating the pertinent areas of criminal science endeavor by political, forensic, or guild interests. I would therefore like to take this opportunity to introduce the reader to my own biases and beliefs concerning the proper study . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.