Imagery in Teaching and Learning: An Autobiography of Research in Four World Views

Imagery in Teaching and Learning: An Autobiography of Research in Four World Views

Imagery in Teaching and Learning: An Autobiography of Research in Four World Views

Imagery in Teaching and Learning: An Autobiography of Research in Four World Views

Synopsis

His study of the use of mental imagery in the elementary school classroom led Jerome S. Allender to examine imagery techniques in the adult learning process, the improvement of teaching skills, and the enhancement of the human learning experience in general. Four world views form the investigative framework for this research, as each individual study yields significant data, findings, and conclusions which are then given practical application. This comparative approach broadens the scope of the work to include not only relevance in the classroom, but also exploration of the role imagery plays in the interaction of fantasy and reality.

Excerpt

Should the foreword to an important new book be an exercise in reminiscence and nostalgia? When I was invited to write this foreword to Imagery in Teaching and Learning I was both tempted and troubled. My old friend Jerry Allender is a prominent humanistic educator and psychologist. I had never felt particularly comfortable with the humanistic point of view. However, as I read through the volume, I found a remarkable book, particularly noteworthy for the ways in which it helped to bring a humanistic perspective into close and comfortable contact with the other orientations of educational research. In both theory and method, Imagery is a bridge between the best aspects of several approaches to educational theory and practice. How could I best discuss the book and its contributions?

I then noticed Allender's subtitle, An Autobiography of Research in Four World Views, and it provided the answer I sought. If Allender could best portray his research program as a form of autobiography, so I could most effectively craft my foreword in the same genre.

When Jerry Allender and I were graduate students at the University of Chicago nearly 30 years ago, there were only a few things of which we were sure. We knew that most other folks our age who were studying to be educational psychologists were practicing an orthodoxy called "behaviorism" or "S-R psychology"; we were not. Other budding educational psychologists were worrying about memory for paired-associate lists or mediation theory; we were not. In fact, I remember Philip Jackson teaching . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.