Freewill or Predestination: The Battle over Saving Grace in Mid-Tudor England

Freewill or Predestination: The Battle over Saving Grace in Mid-Tudor England

Freewill or Predestination: The Battle over Saving Grace in Mid-Tudor England

Freewill or Predestination: The Battle over Saving Grace in Mid-Tudor England

Synopsis

An exploration of the opposition of a Lollard-like group of free-willers to the official teaching of the Edwardian church on predestination... Theirs is a fascinating story... raises some extremely interesting questions about the true nature of the English Church of the period. ENGLISH HISTORICAL REVIEWThis study traces the mainstream of early English reaction to thespread of the predestinarian doctrines of the continental reformerswhich began to dominate England's Protestant leadership during theEdwardian years. Through an examination of both familiar sources anduntapped local records, Dr Penny that finds a mature alternative toGenevan theology existed by the reign of Mary Tudor, led by of a coreof `freewill men' who, in Lollard fashion, looked to the scripturesin English for their beliefs, rather than to the new ecclesiastical establishment and state officialdom.Dr Penny describes in detail the interaction between radical andreformed and the state of intellectual warfare over election and predestination which developed between them, and sheds additional light on the careers of both freewill leaders and major figures in the main Protestant camp, including the Oxford martyrs.D. ANDREW PENNY is assistant professor of history at The King's College, Edmonton, Canada.

Excerpt

I wish to acknowledge my especial indebtedness to a number of people who have provided invaluable assistance of one sort or another in the production of this book: firstly, to Dr Kenneth R. Davis, for awakening (and to a large degree creating) my interest in intellectual and ecclesiastical history while at the University of Waterloo; to Dr W. Stanford Reid, for suggesting that I investigate radical activities in the south-east of England during the Reformation era, and for ably supervising my doctoral dissertation at the University of Guelph; to Mrs Diana Burnett of Oakville, Ontario, and Miss Derryan Paul, Lecturer in Palaeography and Archive Administration, College of Librarianship, Dyfed, Wales, for a stellar job in transcribing and translating key Latin sources; to Dr Vaden House, my colleague at The King's College, and James Dykstra, former student and recent project aide, for indispensable technical assistance; to Professor Sir Geoffrey Elton for his constant encouragement, indefatigable correspondence, and amazing vision in helping to resuscitate and reshape this project, and see it through to its now happy conclusion; and lastly, but by no means least, to my wife, Hazel, sometime research assistant, travel companion and valued critic, for incredible patience and enthusiasm which have permitted her to enter fully into the spirit and purpose of this study. To all, my heartfelt thanks and deepest appreciation.

D. Andrew Penny 7 March 1989 . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.