Born to Win: Transactional Analysis with Gestalt Experiments

Born to Win: Transactional Analysis with Gestalt Experiments

Born to Win: Transactional Analysis with Gestalt Experiments

Born to Win: Transactional Analysis with Gestalt Experiments

Synopsis

A national bestseller in 1971, Born to Win still sells thousands of copies each year. The insights in the book are now fundamental to how we see ourselves. It was one of the first self-help books to analyze communication styles and its 50 gestalt exercises are as revealing as ever about the roles people reenact in their Parent and Child ego states. Photos.

Excerpt

We are honored that after a quarter of a century and well over three million copies in English plus 18 foreign translations, people all over the world still turn to Born to Win to broaden their winning streaks.

When we first wrote this book, we had no idea it would reach such a wide audience. We imagined our first readers to be psychology students, and were greatly pleased by praise from many professionals. Stephen B. Karpman, M.D., a psychiatrist then at the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco, responded: "In the writing style there is a patience, grace, thoroughness, clarity, and 'giving' that is unique in the field ... I see it as a landmark book in the field of psychological writing." After Born to Win was published in 1971, readers responded much more avidly than we had ever hoped. To this day we are gratified to hear from readers who have recently picked up Born to Win and found it to be helpful in their lives.

We remember a student who came to our meeting place while we were working on our book. She brought us a newspaper clipping about a young man's body that had been dredged up from the river. On his arm a tattoo read, Born to Lose. Our reaction was that indeed we are not born to lose. Each of us has the capacity to love, to learn, to grow, and to allow our creative spirits to be expressed out into the world in a positive way. But things may happen to us that distort our feelings and self-perception, lower our expectations, and block us from fulfilling our full potential. Such negative experiences and decisions keep us from becoming our possible selves.

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