American Indians and Federal Aid

American Indians and Federal Aid

American Indians and Federal Aid

American Indians and Federal Aid

Excerpt

Of all nonwhite ethnic groups, American Indians are in the least favorable economic position.Living on a reservation that is far removed from the mainstream of American life, the Indian is often torn between a desire to remain on the reservation, preserving his tribal culture despite limited economic opportunity, and a desire to break away for a chance at greater economic benefits in an alien environment.

To develop the economic potential of the reservation and to ease the burden of adjustment for those Indians who want to relocate, the federal government conducts a variety of assistance programs.The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate those programs, and to identify their strengths and weaknesses. It concludes with an estimate of the additional funds needed to make the federal effort more effective.

The author appreciates the generous assistance of several Indian leaders who provided essential information: Robert Lewis, governor of the Zuñi Tribe; Robert Jim, chairman of the Yakima Tribal Council; Emmett York, chairman of the Mississippi Choctaw Tribal Council; and Enos Poorbear, chairman of the Oglala Sioux Tribal Council.He also wishes to thank the Bureau of Indian Affairs for providing unpublished materials that were basic to the analysis.He is particularly grateful to Joseph Lasalle of the Employment Assistance Branch, L. Madison Coombs of the Division of Education, Gordon Evans of the Division of Industrial Development and Tourism, and above all to former Commissioner of . . .

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