The Limits of Power: America's Role in the World

The Limits of Power: America's Role in the World

The Limits of Power: America's Role in the World

The Limits of Power: America's Role in the World

Excerpt

If this book has a principal theme, it is that our foreign policy should be more restrained and, insofar as prudent judgment can determine, more closely in keeping with the movement of history. If it has a personal mark, it is that which I believe Adlai Stevenson would have made on American foreign policy, had his ideas and his attitudes been translated into political reality.

Its general practical conclusions are: first, that the United States should be more ready than it has in the past to use international or multi-national agencies so as to show more certainly our "decent respect to the opinions of mankind"; second, that our use of instrumentalities and devices such as the Central Intelligence Agency and of military influence established through the distribution and sale of arms should be restricted and more carefully controlled; and third, that the Senate, principally through the Foreign Relations Committee . . .

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