The Loyalists of Connecticut

The Loyalists of Connecticut

The Loyalists of Connecticut

The Loyalists of Connecticut

Excerpt

TERCENTENARY COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT

COMMITTEE ON HISTIRICAL PUBLICATIONS

The Loyalists of Connecticut

EPAPHRODITUS PECK

A LARGE proportion of Americans have been imbued with the idea that the American Revolution was a spontaneous and practically unanimous uprising of the colonists against tyranny and oppression, and that the tories were a small group of obstinate and evil-minded persons who amply deserved whatever harsh treatment they received. Recent studies by impartial historians have shown, however, that this conception of our Revolutionary history is very far from true.

In New York the supporters of the king were in a clear majority, if not in numbers, at least in wealth, public distinction, and influence. New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia contained large and influential loyalist minorities. North Carolina was about equally divided. South Carolina probably and Georgia certainly had loyalist majorities.

Philadelphia, though the home of the Declaration of Independence, was occupied by British troops during a considerable part of the war, and the British officers were then conspicuous in the social life of the city. Of course . . .

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