Marketing Communications: A Behavioral Approach to Men, Messages, and Media

Marketing Communications: A Behavioral Approach to Men, Messages, and Media

Marketing Communications: A Behavioral Approach to Men, Messages, and Media

Marketing Communications: A Behavioral Approach to Men, Messages, and Media

Excerpt

These are exciting times. Knowledge in marketing and communications is increasing at so rapid a pace that the businessman finds it hard to keep up, even in areas where he already has competence. The teacher is acutely aware of the torrent of new discoveries. He has the added burden of screening material for students whose time and data- processing abilities are even more limited than his own. This very outpouring of knowledge may cause both businessman and teacher to hesitate when faced with an attempt, as in this book, to extend the horizons of the traditional business disciplines to include the behavioral sciences. Teachers, in particular, will ask how they can find room in their syllabi for new material, and which of the old must give way to the new.

Yet I feel neither businessman, nor teacher, nor student actually has any choice in the matter. Or rather, that they have no choice as to whether to apply the insights of the behavioral sciences to their problems, only a question as to how to do so. Businessmen, in fact, have been receptive to these insights, even eager for them, although an ad hoe, piecemeal, unsystematic approach has often led them from one catchword to another. Their expectations have frequently been too high and their demands too great, so that their subsequent disillusionment has been disheartening. Some educators, on the other hand, have been slow to adopt the new because of the value they placed upon the old. As a teacher, I share this respect for the conventional wisdom: I do not feel, however, that one need be the enemy of the other. (This text, for example, has been used for six terms at the University of Notre Dame in what was once a conventional course in advertising; a traditional text is still used as a companion volume.) If knowledge is increasing today, so is the ability of our students to handle more substantial intellectual fare; more students die of boredom than are killed by overwork. Unless we in business challenge our students with more substantial content, I feel we may lose the best of them. The alert and able students, who the business firm of today needs and whose careers in business would benefit all society, will turn from us to other disciplines which make demands commensurate with their abilities and aspirations.

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