The Monroe Doctrine, Its Importance in the International Life of the States of the New World

The Monroe Doctrine, Its Importance in the International Life of the States of the New World

The Monroe Doctrine, Its Importance in the International Life of the States of the New World

The Monroe Doctrine, Its Importance in the International Life of the States of the New World

Excerpt

On the second day of December, 1823, the President of the United States in his annual message to Congress expressed his opinion upon the foreign policy of his country with respect to Europe and America which from that day to this has borne the name of the Monroe Doctrine. In 1923 the Centenary of the message was celebrated formally and informally throughout the United States, the Secretary of State, the Honorable Charles Evans Hughes, delivering, on the 30th of November, at Philadelphia, an address on "The Centenary of the Monroe Doctrine," in which he not only stated its origin but expressed the opinion that it will apply to the relations of the United States in the future as it has in the past. The Doctrine is larger than the United States; it is continental, and, having stood a hundred years, it already makes a claim to immorality.

The undersigned felt that the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace should contribute in some way to the hundreth anniversary of the Doctrine which has made for peace and which has at times kept the peace between the New and the Old World. It seemed that the best contribution that the Endowment could make would be a collection of expressions of opinion by Latin Americans regarding the Monroe Doctrine and expressions by prominent North Americans upon the same subject. Authorized by the Executive Committee of the Endowment to make arrangement for such a collection, the Director of the Division of International Law requested Mr. Alejandro Alvarez, the distinguished Chilean publicist, to select from the innumerable expressions of opinion by Latin and North Americans those which in his judgement were best calculated to show the nature of the Doctrine and the extent to which it had appealed to the minds of the leading publicists and statesmen of the Americas. As the present volume shows, Mr. Alvarez accepted the invitation and has performed the task, indicating what should in his opinion be included and grouping his selections with brief but masterly comment so as to bring out clearly the different views held on the subject of the Doctrine. The only difficulty which he experienced was that of choosing among the many statements which he would have liked to include, and it was with deep regret that he found himself obliged to be content with what might be called characteristic expressions of opinion rather than to mark for publication all those which in his judgment were worthy in inclusion.

The appreciation in which John Bassett Moore monumental Digest of International Law is held, not only in the United States but in the Americas, is evident from the copious extracts to be found in the present volume. Mr. Alvarez has indeed laid a heavy hand on JudgeMoore Digest, but it is the hand of a friend, of an admirer, and of a worker in the same broad field of . . .

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