The Economic Independence of Poland: A Study in Trade Adjustments to Political Objectives

The Economic Independence of Poland: A Study in Trade Adjustments to Political Objectives

The Economic Independence of Poland: A Study in Trade Adjustments to Political Objectives

The Economic Independence of Poland: A Study in Trade Adjustments to Political Objectives

Excerpt

Economic adjustment is an inevitable aftermath of war. The normal flow of trade among the states of the world is interrupted by the hostilities. Under the impetus of the frenzy for killing men and the desperate ambition for dynamiting the path to victory, national economies are stimulated to feverish activity. The political objectives of the countries in battle dominate the functioning of human society, sadly blinded to the economic consequences of its course. Reason, for the moment, seems incapable of subjecting the passions of men to intelligent discipline.

After war comes peace. Human beings and human groups are tired and exhausted; yet the economic consequences of the combat are still to be endured. Economic must follow military demobilization. Industries which have been producing for the political emergency which has engulfed the society in which they function must readjust their programs to an altered situation. Economic wealth which has been so recklessly dissipated under the influence of human desperation has undergone a metamorphosis and exists as a sort of tragic memorandum to youth and unborn generations of a debt which exists as a charge against its future and which diverts a portion of annual national incomes into channels which have been grooved by the blood of fighting men.

Peace, especially if it is a restless one, may continue the same prejudices and suspicions which motivated war. The Society of Nations awakens from its revelry to find itself bound together by a new and particularly onerous bond--a nexus of debtor-creditor relationships. These have been the creation of politics but they are bequeathed to economics to resolve. Politics has led economics into a dilemma, a dilemma which would not be insoluble if politics would retire for a vacation. Economics in these days, however, seems to be but the uneasy conscience . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.