The Idea of a Modern University

The Idea of a Modern University

The Idea of a Modern University

The Idea of a Modern University

Excerpt

During the nineteenth century Cardinal Newman The Idea of a Uni- versity expressed the ideal of a secular university in Anglo-American culture, whose institutions of higher education had reflected in many ways the pervasive influence of the religious establishment. With the emergence of the research-oriented German university system, an even clearer differentiation was made between the religious and the secular; the quest for salvation was subordinated to the quest for the truth, especially new truths.

Neither Cardinal Newman's view nor that of the German university model, although influential, was the decisive force in the emerging patterns of American higher education. For their roots lay in the college of the American colonial experience. As the American college shed its essentially religious character, it became subject to a multiplicity of social, economic, and political pressures. Social needs and tasks that in other countries were fulfilled by nonacademic institutions were entrusted to American colleges and universities to meet. So varied were the interests and activities of American higher education by the middle of the twentieth century that it was impossible to find one overall conception that adequately characterized the crowded academic scene. Clark Kerr's concept, the "multiversity," seemed to be a more accurate description than any other characterization.

The unplanned and undirected growth of American colleges and . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.