The Rise of the Novel of Manners: A Study of English Prose Fiction between 1600 and 1740

The Rise of the Novel of Manners: A Study of English Prose Fiction between 1600 and 1740

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The Rise of the Novel of Manners: A Study of English Prose Fiction between 1600 and 1740

The Rise of the Novel of Manners: A Study of English Prose Fiction between 1600 and 1740

Read FREE!

Excerpt

In the following dissertation two objects have been kept in view; first, the presentation of a succinct account of the more important types of prose narrative current between 1600 and 1740 with special reference to the novel of manners; and second, the facilitation of further studies by supplying full bibliographical details. To accomplish this two-fold purpose only the more typical and influential works have been considered in the essay, but to compensate for the consequent omissions, the minor works, together with discussions concerning authorship, translation, sources, chronology, and the like, have been briefly dealt with in the footnotes and in the bibliography. To make the latter of the greatest practical value I have endeavoured to cite my authority for every title, and as far as possible have added the British Museum shelf number. Neither the essay nor the bibliography makes: any pretence to completeness. This study is, so to speak, but a clearing of the ground in a field where little has been done and much remains to be accomplished.

My indebtedness to previous studies, such as the general works of Dunlop, Cross, and Raleigh, and to the numerous monographs devoted to special periods and topics are indicated in the notes and bibliography. To Professor Joel E. Spingarn, of Columbia University, I am indebted for information bearing on the French development and for numerous valuable suggestions. My thanks are also due to Professor John W. Cunliffe, of the University of Wisconsin, for his kindness in procuring me reading privileges in the Bodleian Library; to Professor Ashley H. Thorndike and Professor William W. Lawrence, of Columbia University, for helpful criticism, and most of all to Professor William P. Trent, of Columbia University, under whose kindly guidance this study has been made. I desire, also, to express my thanks to my mother, without whose constant encouragement and counsel this book would never have been written.

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