International Law and Diplomacy in the Spanish Civil Strife

International Law and Diplomacy in the Spanish Civil Strife

International Law and Diplomacy in the Spanish Civil Strife

International Law and Diplomacy in the Spanish Civil Strife

Excerpt

Insurrections and civil wars in Spain customarily have been productive of international complications. Considering the strategic locations and the natural wealth of the Spanish domains, the extensive maritime frontiers, the sizable navy and merchant marine, and the passionate manner in which arms have always been employed, it is not surprising that these crises have had such results. Spanish questions have long been intimately related to the international struggle for power in Europe, and foreign states have intervened in virtually every major civil disturbance in Spain. The contemporaneous strife in Spain has been no exception to the general rule.

This volume does not purport to be a history of the recent struggle. It does not undertake to fathom the causes of the disturbance, to assay the issues at stake, to trace the course of hostilities, or to analyze the political consequences. It merely represents an attempt to discuss impartially some of the outstanding problems of international law and diplomacy which have been evoked by the conflict and upon which reliable information has been procurable. Problems of international law and diplomacy common to civil disturbances in general have appeared as might have been expected. These, however, have been supplemented by activities and questions heretofore never encountered in such disturbances in Europe or elsewhere. For the first time aircraft, submarines, and submarine mines have been extensively employed, raising complex international issues, not provided for in existing conventions or generally accepted rules of international law. Long regarded as a general principle of international law, non-intervention was made the object of a special accord and accompanied by the institution of significant agreements and international administrative machinery. The Spanish hostilities have been made a testing ground for the weapons and engines of destruction of many nations. At the same time they have been utilized as a laboratory for the testing of national policies, international law and international organization. If it may seem deplorable to some . . .

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