The History of the University of Oxford - Vol. 4

The History of the University of Oxford - Vol. 4

The History of the University of Oxford - Vol. 4

The History of the University of Oxford - Vol. 4

Synopsis

Volume IV of the magisterial History of the University of Oxford covers the seventeenth century, a period of institutional and intellectual expansion for the University and of religious and political tumult for Oxford in general. In this volume, leading experts examine Oxford and its University's role in the major British events of the century, including the Civil War, the Commonwealth, and the Restoration.

Excerpt

The idea of this volume was first conceived under the editorship of Hugh Trevor- Roper, Lord Dacre of Glanton. But by the time he left Oxford for Peterhouse, Cambridge, and handed over to the present editor, it was still at the planning stage. The opportunity was taken at that point to rethink matters, in discussions with the then general editor Trevor Aston who continued to play a supportive role right up to his untimely death; we were in fact due to meet to discuss the volume, at his suggestion, only a few days after he died in 1985. An exemplary model was by then to hand in the shape of volume iii of the series, covering the sixteenth century and edited by James McConica, and this has been followed with some adaptations. Among other changes to the original scheme of volume iv was the decision to commission a new author for the chapter 'University and Society', which in the event was written by Stephen Porter during his two-year appointment as research assistant; the other additions to the team were Alan Crossley, John Elliot, Kenneth Fincham, Penelope Gouk, Brian Levack, Paul Morgan, Ian Roy, and John Twigg. Unfortunately John Platt proved unable to contribute a chapter on theology to supplement that on 'Religious Controversy'. Extra burdens have also been shouldered, especially by Mordechai Feingold, whose scholarly labours have been massive, while Alan Crossley has kindly helped with chapters other than his own. The maps have been expertly drawn by Julian Munby.

Those writing about seventeenth-century Oxford are privileged to be able to draw on the work of a number of predecessors, notably that of the contemporary Anthony Wood and his subsequent editors. There are in addition many other relevant volumes published by the Oxford Historical Society, and despite the passage of time Falconer Madan Oxford Books remains an indispensable bibliographical aid. In our task we have incurred numerous debts: to the staff of that jewel in Oxford's crown the Bodleian Library, to successive keepers of the university archives--especially Ruth Vyse and Simon Bailey--and to the college librarians and archivists many of whom are thanked individually in the various chapters. Like the other volumes in the series this volume has benefited from the generous funding provided by Oxford University, the individual colleges and the Nuffield Foundation. We are as well most grateful to the Scouloudi Foundation, for a grant to cover the illustrations. Ralph Evans, recently project co-ordinator, provided a vital link for a volume editor based in London. Anne Gelling, on behalf of the publishers, has always been a source of sound advice and practical help. During the editorial process, when only some of the chapters had been produced, I was able to draw on the skills of Adrienne Rosen. Latterly this task has been mine alone, but the copy-editor, Janet Moth, has saved me from frequent slips. We are also . . .

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