Paradoxes of Time in Saint Augustine

Paradoxes of Time in Saint Augustine

Paradoxes of Time in Saint Augustine

Paradoxes of Time in Saint Augustine

Synopsis

Augustine established that the distension of the mind is a necessary condition of our perceiving temporal wholes. At the same time, as Teske explains, this condition is unnatural to the rational soul and results from original sin.

Excerpt

The Wisconsin-Alpha Chapter of Phi Sigma Tau, the International Honor Society for Philosophy at Marquette University, each year invites a scholar to deliver a lecture in honor of St. Thomas Aquinas.

The 1996Aquinas Lecture, Paradoxes of Time in St. Augustine, was delivered in the Tony and Lucille Weasler Auditorium on Sunday, February 25, 1996, by the Reverend Roland J. Teske, S.J., Professor of Philosophy at Marquette University.

Fr. Teske was born in Milwaukee and upon graduation from Marquette University High School entered the Society of Jesus in 1952. After completing his undergraduate work at Saint Louis University, he also earned an M.A. in classics at Saint Louis University and a licentiate degree in sacred theology at St. Mary's College, St. Marys, Kansas. He pursued doctoral studies in philosophy at the University of Toronto, which awarded him the Ph.D. in 1973. Since 1970 he has taught mainly at Marquette University, where he became full professor in 1990. He has also served as acting dean of the College of Philosophy and Letters at Saint Louis University and as visiting professor at Santa Clara University, and he has held the Edmund Miller, S.J. Chair in Classics at John Carroll University.

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