Writings; Commonitories: Grace and Free Will

Writings; Commonitories: Grace and Free Will

Writings; Commonitories: Grace and Free Will

Writings; Commonitories: Grace and Free Will

Excerpt

The restoration to name and fame of Niceta of Remesiana (c. 335-c. 415), whose extant and authentic works appear here for the first time in an English dress, constitutes one of the most romantic stories in the history of patristic research. For centuries a misspelt 'Niceas of Romatiana' was given credit for half a dozen long-lost Instructions for Converts. A still worse spelt 'Nicha' was known to have been addressed in a letter of 366 A. D. by his fellow-bishop, Germinius of Sirmium (near Mitrovicza, on the Save, in modern Jugoslavia). In the third quarter of the sixth century, the saintly and scholarly ex-Senator Cassiodorus praised the 'compendious brevity' and the 'clarity of heavenly doctrine' in a summary of the doctrine of the Trinity to be found in a work on Faith by 'Nicetus.'

Meanwhile, although the works were lost, there was an all but full-length picture of the saintly, scholarly, lovable personality of Niceta contained in a letter and two poems written by the poet-saint, Paulinus of Nola (c. 354-431), an almost exact contemporary of St. Augustine of Hippo (354- 430). In the letter, Niceta appears as a 'venerable' bishop, a man of eminent learning, doctissimus, who had come from . . .

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