Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

Excerpt

In one of the Idler papers, Dr. Samuel Johnson remarks on the lack of solid information in the many travel journals of his day. He writes,

"It may, I think, be justly observed, that few books disappoint their readers more than the narratives of travellers. . . .

"The greater part of travellers tell nothing, because their method of travelling supplies them with nothing to be told. He that enters a town at night, and surveys it in the morning, and then hastens away to another place, and guesses at the manners of the inhabitants by the entertainment which his inn afforded him, may please himself for a time with a hasty change of scenes. . . but let him be contented to please himself without endeavoring to disturb others. . . ."

The Wisconsin State Guide attempts to be such a book as, by its method at least, would not seriously have irritated the good doctor. The writers have travelled up and down Wisconsin, note-books in hand, taking mileages on the main highways, prowling about towns, scouring local libraries, and annoying good citizens by their questions; then checking and rechecking by letter, interview, and arduous hours in the State Historical Library the information they had secured. It is hoped that "he who enters a town at night, and surveys it in the morning" will know more about that town because he has read himself to sleep by this book; that as he leaves the town in the morning the roadside will reveal not merely a succession of acres vaguely changing shape and color, but a land that people have plowed and planted and lived by; that as he urges his car from one destination to another he will occasionally lighten the foot that presses down his accelerator, or steer into some brown side road to observe Wisconsin; and that he who stays at home through the long Wisconsin winters may take vicarious journeys.

This book, however, proposes to be more than a guide to places; for places, unless they present a spectacular break with the mild stretches of ordinary nature, are usually interesting chiefly for the people who inhabit them. This book hopes in some measure to guide . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.