Blackways of Kent

Blackways of Kent

Blackways of Kent

Blackways of Kent

Excerpt

Hylan Lewis has written of one part of the town of Kent, a town of about 4,000 people in the heart of the Piedmont South.

It is true, of course, that the Negro life which Dr. Lewis presents to us is in many fundamental and subtle ways separate from the remainder of Kent. Yet the integral elements of the Negro subculture have evidence in the context of the total community, white and black. They play against, so to speak, integral elements of white culture. And then, as Dr. Lewis shows us, the lines of inter-connection between white and black are numerous and amazingly complex.

It is well to know, then, that Kent is an old town, a county seat. There is no dearth of significant, even compelling, local history in Kent. People who know Kent almost always remark first that it is quite like many of the old towns of the Coastal Plain and Tidewater South. But these same people will not neglect to point out that there are in Kent four cotton mills, and that change and resistance to change in way of life in all parts of the community are virtually preoccupations.

Over wide areas of the Piedmont South the two names "Scotch-Irish" and "Presbyterian" have always been factors to reckon with, and still are. These words, properly understood, describe the people who first settled the countryside from which Kent grew and who to this day figure largely in the life of the town.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.