The Negro and the Communist Party

The Negro and the Communist Party

The Negro and the Communist Party

The Negro and the Communist Party

Excerpt

Not since the Civil War has the Negro question in the United States figured so prominently in national and international affairs. No longer is it a question peculiar to one distinct economic and cultural region of the country; it is nation-wide, extending from Boston to Birmingham, from Seattle to Savannah, from Detroit to the Delta. And no longer is it an exclusive concern of the United States; it occupies the close attention of countries all over the globe--China, India, Russia, and the various colonial states of Africa and South America. It is not likely to decline in importance. On the contrary, it will perplex us until such time as we achieve some fundamental resolution of the conflict between our democratic values and our undemocratic treatment of more than 15,000,000 American Negroes.

Evidence of the growing importance of this question is everywhere at hand. Newspapers devote considerable space to reporting and editorializing on its various aspects. Political parties develop serious schisms because neither spokesmen nor followers can agree upon a program to deal with it. Government agencies continually intervene in an effort to achieve workable answers to certain of its specific manifestations; as, for example, in employment and housing. Scholars devote their full energies in efforts to learn more about its different aspects. More recently it has received wide attention among educators who are convinced that their special instruments can make some contribution in providing the answer. The courts are continually forced to render new inter-

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