Streams, Lakes, Ponds

Streams, Lakes, Ponds

Streams, Lakes, Ponds

Streams, Lakes, Ponds

Excerpt

Although about three-fourths of the surface of the earth is water, the fourth that is land seems to us of more importance. It is where we live. Could we re-acquire gills, fins, and other adaptations to life in water, doubtless land would seem of minor concern. In such case, and even as intelligent fish, we would be wrong, of course; for what would a fish do without land? Many times in the following pages we shall note how the neighboring lands affect the fish of stream or lake. The inherent nature of in-draining areas, the treatment they receive from man, and all that meteorological conditions do to them, largely determine the potentialities for fish in water. The bottom of stream or lake is mainly overflowed land; in later pages we shall have to emphasize repeatedly the critical significance of bottoms in relation to productivity. The bottoms of the pond, so often ignored by the fish farmer, the bordering meadows and cultivated lands, the forests and highways are equally important with climate and weather as controlling factors in pond life.

This is not to say that just plain water is needed only to keep the fish wet and to obviate thirst -- important considerations, to be sure. Fish cannot live on water alone, but they need it in great quantity. Why? Not just to provide room for lots of fish; chiefly because only a large volume of water can carry adequate amounts of essential respiratory gases, along with other nutrients. The . . .

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