The Negro and the Schools

The Negro and the Schools

The Negro and the Schools

The Negro and the Schools

Excerpt

It would seem to be a simple task to take the outside dimensions of the dual public school system which has served whites and Negroes in the United States through all our history, and not much more difficult to appraise its general effects upon public education.

In practice, however, this has turned out to be an enormously complex assignment, one that has taxed the skills of the scholars who performed the necessary hard labor and often perplexed the newspaper editor who came finally to write this summary report of their findings.

In the first place--and for several reasons this is an important consideration to bear in mind--the structure of public education in the United States is almost as decentralized as the nation's system of municipal government. National and state agencies set its standards, or attempt to, but final administrative authority is vested in thousands of local school districts and exercised by hundreds of thousands of elected school board members and appointed officials. There is wide variety in the methods by which these agencies keep their accounts and, although formalized reports on their activities drift upward through fixed channels, there are no absolutes . . .

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