A Two-Party South?

A Two-Party South?

A Two-Party South?

A Two-Party South?

Excerpt

A new breed of academician has come to the fore in recent years. He is the broker in research, the entrepreneur who organizes men and materials to create a product somebody wants. A research entrepreneur nonpareil is Roscoe C. Martin, and I am happy to tag this book as another in a long line of works for which he deserves first credit. Mr. Martin initiated the study of southern politics mentioned in the foreword, arranged to finance it, hired the staff, and rode herd on his willing charges until all the deadlines were met. His efforts have also produced this volume.

For almost three years I worked with V. O. Key, Jr. I cannot burden Mr. Key with any responsibility for the present book, but most of what I know about its subject I learned from him, and I am sure that any insights the book contains trace their lineage to his own. He has been a tutor and friend whose generosity is beyond acknowledgment.

The book would not have been completed without the aid of the Rockefeller Foundation, the Bureau of Public Administration of the University of Alabama, and the Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina. C. B. Robson, chairman of the Department of Political Science in the latter university, gave constant support. William K. Hubbell drew the . . .

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