Science and the Course of History

Science and the Course of History

Science and the Course of History

Science and the Course of History

Excerpt

I hope that this book will make some small contribution toward the fulfillment of a task whose importance I have stressed on other occasions. Hitherto the natural sciences and the cultural sciences have largely been regarded as worlds far apart. Yet they merge into a meaningful whole if we consider scientific knowledge not merely as a finished product but as a historical development, if we perceive its dimension of historic depth. Or, to look at it the other way around, human history with all its scattered, disparate events becomes a unified coherent process if we look on the gradual advance of man's knowledge as a basic theme of historical development.

A glance at the present era suffices to convince us that science makes history, that the growth of our knowledge is a compelling force in historical events--and here I am far from thinking of atom . . .

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