There Shall Be No Night

There Shall Be No Night

There Shall Be No Night

There Shall Be No Night

Excerpt

After the first performance of "There Shall Be No Night" in Providence, Rhode Island, on March 29, 1940, a young man, a stranger, came up to me and said, "You certainly have changed your point of view since 'Idiot's Delight.'" There was a distinct note of accusation in his voice. This was the first of many similar and many less temperate accusations which this play has provoked. Having identified myself time and again in the past as a pacifist, I had now become a "Warmonger."

It is a strange fact that many people who can bear with equanimity all sorts of assaults upon their moral character or their personal habits are goaded to indignant counter-attack when they are charged with inconsistency. "I don't mind being called a black-hearted villain, an enemy of society. In fact, I might even be flattered by such distinction. But--by God--I'll fight any man who dares to imply that I have been untrue to myself."

Therefore, I wish to preface this play with a review of the development of my own point of view, as it has been expressed in other plays. I want to say that "There Shall Be No Night" is not a denial of "Idiot's Delight": it is a sequel. I realize that there is an appreciable difference be-

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