The United Nations: Background, Organization, Functions, Activities

The United Nations: Background, Organization, Functions, Activities

The United Nations: Background, Organization, Functions, Activities

The United Nations: Background, Organization, Functions, Activities

Excerpt

In this book Professors Vandenbosch and Hogan have presented a lucid picture of the complex factors involved in the processes and practices of international organization. Their approach to the multiple facets of this activity appears to be quite objective and sufficiently comprehensive to furnish an over-all evaluation of the progress already achieved.

It is almost impossible, indeed, for any author dealing with the dynanuc problems of international relations ever to give a completely up-to-date report. Events flow swiftly, and frequently a decision on mere procedure does affect basically the course of action on a fundamental substantive matter. Professors Vandenbosch and Hogan have come close to that desirable goal and do not fail to indicate where students can find follow-up information concerning items of particular interest.

The literature on the United Nations and the Specialized Agencies already embraces hundreds of titles, outside the publications of the intergovernmental bodies themselves; yet, not all phases of their evolution have been fully surveyed nor submitted to the fire of critical appraisal.

One point that this book brings forth with particular emphasis is that all activities of the United Nations system are part of an indivisible aim: collective security. This collective security, as the authors point out, is the hope of all men, and the human being thus again becomes the principal subject of international action.

Opinions may differ as to the actual degree of world community achieved from the political standpoint, but there seems to be a general agreement on the geophysical and geodemographic unity of the world emphasized and made more evident by scientific and technological progress.

There may also be different evaluations of the prospects of building supranational as distinguished from international bodies through which the world can strive for higher forms of organization.

But there can be no controversy over the fact that all peoples, whatever may be their individual philosophy, even those now under the temporary sway of nationalism, wish to be a part in the broader picture of the world as their best insurance against being by-passed by the process of advancement towards a better and more peaceful life.

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